[Outline] [Books] [Papers] [Articles ] [Teaching] [Consulting][Talks] [Blogs] [Contact]

Subhajit Datta

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Outline

All my working life, I have been developing, designing, researching, teaching, writing or merely thinking about software systems. Sometimes I have done more than one of these activities at a time, for profit or pleasure. And all this while, hopefully I have been learning more about software - how it is made and how it relates to our lives.

I have been fortunate to study and work at fine institutions, and with finer people. But the biggest impact for me has been finding lasting interests. To paraphrase from The Brook - affiliations may come and affiliations may go, but interests go on for ever! If you want to know where all I have been, please see my resume. If you want more details, please email me for a CV.

Some of the information at this website is also available elsewhere on the Web; for example Amazon (for my books), DBLP (for my papers), various news media (for my articles etc.) and my blog . The reason to have them all together here is of course, self-promotion. Additionally, I have tried to present them in a way that will hopefully help me reach out to like and unlike (!) minded people whom I do not usually get to meet.

Thanks again for your interest in my interests, and let the conversation begin.


Books

Software Engineering: Concepts and Applications by Subhajit Datta (Oxford University Press, 2010)

This is a book about bridging the critical gap between software engineering as taught in the classroom, and as practiced in the real world. In its five logical parts, the book covers important topics related to understanding the realm of software engineering, planning and managing software development, making software, testing, maintaining, and modifying software systems, and the latest trends of software development. Each of the chapters starts with a motivation to engage the reader’s interest and ends with exercises to test the reader’s understanding. Many of the chapters have case studies for highlighting the application of significant ideas in real world scenarios.

You may refer to the table of contents: brief and detailed; learn more about the book from the publisher's website, Amazon, or Google books; check out if it is available at a library near you from WorldCat; stay tuned to the latest updates at the book's Facebook page; add to the errata.

Metrics-Driven Enterprise Software Development by Subhajit Datta (J.Ross Publishing, 2007)

This is not a book about how enterprise software should be built. This is a book about how enterprise software is built, and how metrics can help make a difference. There are many books harping on the “should”of enterprise software development. The fact that there are many books implies: a. there are many strong feelings about the subject, and b. there is very little consensus. This book illustrates how simple and intuitive techniques can go a long way in meeting customer expectations better, building systems that are easier to evolve and improve, and cause developers less pain and penance.

You may refer to the table of contents and a collection of reviews; learn more about the book from Amazon or Google books; check out if it is available at a library near you from WorldCat; stay tuned to the latest updates at the book's Facebook page. The book has been featured in "great success metrics titles" and "all-time success metrics list" at Amazon.


Papers

I am very curious about research in areas I know nothing about. But I am sad when some researchers in such areas tell me how happy they would be to share all their results with me, if only I had the adequate preparation, or in short, I will not understand their results. It is far from trivial to communicate the excitement of research to the uninitiated. I thus challenge myself to write - in few sentences and without any jargon - what excites me most about each of the following papers. These are not the paper abstracts.

Peer-reviewed Publications

[Datta et al, 2016b]

Datta, S., Basuchowdhuri, P., Acharya, S., Majumder, S. (2016). The Habits of Highly Effective Researchers: An Empirical Study. Accepted at the IEEE Transactions on Big Data.

Why do few researcher's make it big, while most do not? We confront this question across five different computing domains, by identifying influential researchers using a novel algorithm, and then studying their characteristics. We find that some of the oft repeated prescriptions for research success do not withstand empirical scrutiny!

[Datta et al, 2016a]

Datta, S., Sarkar, S., Sajeev, A.S.M. (2016). How long will this live? Discovering the lifespans of software engineering ideas. IEEE Transactions on Big Data (2016), Vol. 2, No. 2, April - June 2016, pages 124-137.

In an enhanced version of [Datta et al, 2015a] we further investigate the myth of rapid obsolescence of software engineering ideas, and arrive at more interesting results.

[Das et al, 2016]

Das, R., Wang, X., Khezri, B., Webster, R.D., Sikdar, P.K., Datta, S. (2016). Mercury isotopes of atmospheric particle bound mercury for source apportionment study in urban Kolkata, India. Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene 4:000098(2016).

Outdoor air pollution is the 5th largest killer in India. Metals binding to the tiny air particulate matter are breathed, and they reach our lungs and mix with blood. In this study, we investigated the sources of heavy metals in the tiny air particulate matter at Kolkata.

[Yoong et al, 2015]

Yoong, C., Ng, G., Cheung, N., Zhang, Y., Lee, H., Datta, S. (2015). Open designettes, flowcharts, and pseudocodes in Python programming with the aid of Finch. ICCE 2015: Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education (2015).

Teaching the first course in programming teaches me a lot about programming, every time. This time we tried introducing programming concepts through the use of design constructs, and an ornithomorphic robot. The students enjoyed, we liked the experience, and the results were interesting.

[Datta et al, 2015b]

Datta, S., Bhatt, D., Jain, M., Sarkar, P., Sarkar, S. (2015). The importance of being isolated: An empirical study on Chromium reviews. ESEM 2015: Proceedings of the 9th ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement (2015), pages 1-4.

These days, it is fashionable to be connected. After all, that is how we collect "likes". But can isolation facilitate some types of work? We confront this question with data, and get some provocative results.

[Jongeling et al, 2015]

Jongeling, R., Datta, S., Serebrenik, A. (2015). Choosing your weapons: On sentiment analysis tools for software engineering research. ICSME 2015: Proceedings of the 31st IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution (2015), pages 531-535.

Sentiment analysis is finding application in many areas, and software engineering is no exception. We show how it is important to be careful with sentiments.

[Das et al, 2015]

Das, R., Bahareh, K., Srivastava, B., Datta, S., Sikdar, P.,Webster, R.,Wang, X. (2015). Trace element composition of PM2.5 and PM10 from Kolkata – a heavily polluted Indian metropolis. Atmospheric Pollution Research 6 (2015).

An ode to air; and a foray into interdisciplinary studies.

[Datta et al, 2015a]

Datta, S., Sarkar S., Sajeev, A., Kumar N. (2015). Discovering the rise and fall of software engineering ideas from scholarly publication data. BigScholar 2015: Proceedings of the 2nd WWW Workshop on Big Scholarly Data, pages 585-590.

"Oh! software engineering is all about fads ..." I have heard this many times, and I suspect this is a general opinion about some aspects of computing. We decided to take a dispassionate look at this allegation, by looking at 19,000+ papers by 21,000+ authors from 1975 to 2010, and calculating a "half-life" of software engineering ideas.

[Datta and Lade, 2015]

Datta, S., Lade, P. (2015). Will this be quick? A case study of bug resolution times across industrial projects. ISEC '15: Proceedings of the 8th India Software Engineering Conference, pages 20-29.

Those of us who have been in the trenches of software development, can recollect hearing ``give this to me yesterday" often, from customers who are always right. Quickness is a virtue in bug resolution, especially in large scale industrial systems. We develop a technique based on processing descriptions in bug reports, to determine how long a bug will take to resolve.

[Datta et al, 2014c]

Datta, S., Sarkar P., Majumder S. (2014). Developer involvement considered harmful? An empirical examination of Android bug resolution times. SSE 2014: Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Social Software Engineering, pages 45-48.

One of the biggest promises around large scale interactive software development is that enhanced developer involvement is beneficial to completion of tasks. Is it really so? This paper takes look at the promise, and the pitfalls around it.

[Datta, 2014]

Datta, S., (2014). Perspectives on task ownership in mobile operating system development. DeMobile 2014: Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Software Development Lifecycle for Mobile, pages 11-12.

To paraphrase Stroustrup, our civilization increasingly runs on software that runs on mobile devices. Mobile development usually involves a dynamic ecosystem of users and developers. This paper explores the influences on how code reviews get worked on and resolved in mobile software development.

[Rocchi et al, 2014]

Rocchi, P., Spagnoletti P., Datta, S. (2014). An ecological model for digital platforms maintenance and evolution. Organizational Innovation and Change. Vol. 13 of Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organization, pages 263-280.

Development of a theoretical model for bug resolution remains one of the holy grails of software engineering. This paper studies the maintenance life cycle of a major software product and arrives at an unexpected result reflecting on the similarity between software processes to certain biological and physical phenomena.

[Datta et al, 2014b]

Datta, S., Sarkar S., Sajeev A., Kumar N. (2014). Impact, team size, collaboration, and epochs: Stories from four decades of software engineering research. CSI Journal of Computing, Vol. 2, No. 3, pages S2:61-S2:71.

George Mallory, when asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest, reportedly replied "Because it's there". Mountains of digital data are all around us, ever growing. These are fertile fields for serendipity, as we find out in this paper, setting out to uncover some of the typical tricks in the pursuit of research impact!

[Wagstrom and Datta, 2014]

Wagstrom, P., and Datta, S.,(2014). Does latitude hurt while longitude kills? Geographical and temporal separation in a large scale software development project. ICSE 2014: Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Software Engineering, pages 199-210.

For large scale software development, distributed teams are a fact of life. Team members can be spread apart over distance, or separated by time zones (or both). Distance and time have been alleged to have dark effects on human relationships. We investigate how distance and time affects developer interactions in a large commercial software projects with a global team.

[Datta et al., 2014a]

Datta, S., Sarkar P., Das S., Sreshtha S., Lade P., Majumder S. (2014). How many eyeballs does a bug need? An empirical validation of Linus' Law. XP 2014: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Agile Software Development, pages 242-250.

Software engineering alas, lacks the certainly of universal laws such as Newton's and Ohm's. Software engineering's laws are often observations couched as aphorisms; and how persuasive a law is, hinges on the eminence of the observer or the pithiness of the aphorism. With the increasing availability of development data, it is interesting to validate these laws empirically. In this paper we uncover some insights around whether and how more developer attention leads to quicker resolution of bugs in Android development.

[Datta et al., 2013b]

Datta, S., Sajeev A., Sarkar S., Kumar N. (2013). Factors influencing research contributions in software engineering: An empirical study.  APSEC 2013: Proceedings of the 20th Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference, pages 34-41.

There are giants and pygmies in the world of software engineering research publications. How some researchers manage to publish so much and/or get cited so many times is of much speculation. We question the conventional wisdom, and uncover some unconventional ones, in an empirical study of software engineering publication data across several decades.

[Datta et al., 2013a]

Datta, S., Sarkar S., Sajeev A., Kumar N. (2013). How many researchers does it take to make impact? Mining software engineering publication data for collaboration insights . COMPUTE 2013: Proceedings of the 6th ACM India Computing Convention, pages 6:1-6:8.

Over the last couple of decades, software engineering research has become more collaborative. Whether working in large teams or small produces the maximum research impact is an open and interesting question. We explore this question through an empirical study.

[Sarkar and Datta, 2013]

Sarkar, S., Datta, S. (2013). Inferring the untold - Mining software engineering research publication networks. Infosys SETLabs Briefing 01/2014; 12(1), pages 88-95.

Ours is a networked world. Whatever we do or say - even do not do or do not say - link us to many others. Building networks from software engineering research publications opens interesting possibilities for seeing beyond the obvious.

[Sajeev and Datta, 2013]

Sajeev, A., Datta, S. (2013). Introducing programmers to pair programming: A controlled experiment. XP2013: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Agile Software Development, pages 31-45.

That two heads are better than one finds echo in the effectiveness of pair programming in software development. But matchmaking is difficult in software development, as it is in matrimony. Results from our controlled experiment with a cohort of varying industrial programming experience gives some pointers to how best to form pairs (for pair programming).

[Datta et al., 2012b]

Datta, S., Sindhgatta, R., Sengupta, B. (2012). Talk versus work: Characteristics of developer collaboration on the Jazz platform. OOPSLA 2012: Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications, pages 655-668.

Much of the software that runs our lives today has been developed by people in groups who have never seen one another, and are rarely awake at the same time in a 24 hour cycle. It is a phenomenal how they manage to craft supremely complex products. We look at the phenomenon through the lens of social network analysis and find what a person's interactions in a peer group can tell us about the outcome of his/her work, and what can not be told.

[Datta et al., 2012a]

Datta, S., Kumar, N., Sarkar, S. (2012). The social network of software engineering research. ISEC ’12: Proceedings of the 5th India Software Engineering Conference, pages 61-70.

Does a social network emerge from the world of software engineering publications? Delving into this question gets us to understand what qualifies a network to be a social network in the first place, and how the social aspects of a network influence its characteristics at the individual as well as collective level.

[Sindhgatta et al., 2011]

Sindhgatta, R., Sengupta, B., Datta, S. (2011). Coping with distance: An empirical study of communication on the Jazz platform. OOPSLA Companion 2011: Companion to the 26th Annual ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications, pages 155-162.

Much of "global" software development is about team members talking across long distances. Every team has its own way of trying to ensure its members talk to and not past one another. Study of one such team reveals what works and what does not.

[Datta et al., 2011]

Datta, S., Sindhgatta, R., Sengupta, B. (2011). Evolution of developer collaboration on the Jazz platform: A study of a large scale agile project. ISEC ’11: Proceedings of the 4th India Software Engineering Conference, pages 21-30.

As we do something over and over, (hopefully!) we get better at it. Whether developers get better at collaborating with one another as they build a software system bit by bit is an open question. We have not closed the question fully in this paper, but opened some new questions.

[Datta et al., 2010]

Datta, S., Kaulgud, V., Sharma, V. S., and Kumar, N. (2010). A social network based study of software team dynamics. ISEC ’10: Proceedings of the 3rd India Software Engineering Conference, pages 33–42.

In a team, who does the work, and who gets the credit? This is a vexing question, often with more vexing answers. We got a taste of how vexing, when one of the team members wanted to have the results suppressed.

[Datta and van Engelen, 2009]

Datta, S. and van Engelen, R. (2009). An examination of the effects of offshore and outsourced development on the delegation of responsibilities to software components. Software Engineering Approaches for Offshore and Outsourced Development, Volume 16 of LNBIP, pages 73–89. Springer.

In this day and age, to outsource or not is a question that intrigues not only princes of Denmark, but presidents and potentates alike. And "offshore" has been, well, verbed. We explore whether and how all this affects software components - entities that do the real work.

[Berkling et al., 2009]

Berkling, K., Kiragiannis, G., Zundel, A., and Datta, S. (2009). Timeline prediction framework for iterative software engineering projects with changes. Software Engineering Approaches for Offshore and Outsourced Development, Volume 16 of LNBIP, pages 15–32. Springer.

Estimating how long it will take to develop a piece of software has been called a black art. Software that is built in bits, integrating user feedback on the way, presents its own estimation challenges. Based on empirical evidence, we develop a framework that can help is estimating some types of software projects.

[Datta and van Engelen, 2008]

Datta, S. and van Engelen, R. (2008). COMP-REF: A technique to guide the delegation of responsibilities to components in software systems. FASE 2008: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Fundamental Approaches to Software Engineering, Vol. 4961 of LNCS, pages 332–346. Springer.

When we build a team of people to accomplish a task, we look for those who are specially good at something, yet willing to help others in their work. Can we develop a software system with the same philosophy? We present a technique as a first step in that direction.

[Datta et al., 2007]

Datta, S., van Engelen, R., Gaitros, D., and Jammigumpula, N. (2007). Experiences with tracking the effects of changing requirements on Morphbank: A web-based bioinformatics application. ACM-SE 45: Proceedings of the 45th annual southeast regional conference, pages 413–418.

Apropos of the paper below, we apply our mechanism on another real world application.

[Datta and van Engelen, 2006]

Datta, S. and van Engelen, R. (2006). Effects of changing requirements: A tracking mechanism for the analysis workflow. SAC ’06: Proceedings of the 2006 ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, pages 1739–1744.

Death, taxes, and changing requirements are the invariants in a software engineer's life. Although we can not do much about the first two, may be the latter can be reasonably tamed? We develop a way to isolate the effects of changing requirements.

[Datta, 2006b]

Datta, S. (2006b). Crosscutting score: An indicator metric for aspect orientation. ACM-SE 44: Proceedings of the 44th annual southeast regional conference, pages 204–208.

There are multiple ways of looking at a software ecosystem. We can see objects collaborating by calling methods on one another, or we can see functionality that cuts across components. Which way to see when is what we consider here.

[Datta, 2006a]

Datta, S. (2006a). Agility measurement index: A metric for the crossroads of software development methodologies. ACM-SE 44: Proceedings of the 44th annual southeast regional conference, pages 271–273.

Quo vadis is one of those enduring questions. Which methodology is best for a particular software development scenario is explored through a metric.

[Datta, 2005]

Datta, S. (2005). Integrating the FURPS+ model with use cases - A metrics driven approach. ISSRE 2005: Supplementary Proceedings of the 16th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering, pages 4.51–4.52. IEEE Computer Society.

Use cases see a software system (in fact, any system) outside-in, as users would see and use the system. But users are not only interested in using a system, they also want the system to deliver the "ilities" -- functionality, usability, reliability, performance, and supportability, and more. We suggest a metric to marry use cases with the "ilities".

[Datta and Vaishnavi, 2004]

Datta, S. and Vaishnavi, N. (2004). A process compliance and process improvement algorithm. IT Process Model knowledge network, ICM AssetWeb of IBM.

Processes are great on paper. But some process tasks are more amenable to being followed, and some teams and individuals are more prone to process compliance. We propose a way to make processes more easy on everyone.

Technical Reports

[Datta and van Engelen., 2009]

Datta, S., van Engelen, R. (2009). Project-entropy: A metric to understand resource allocation dynamics across software projects. Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Technical Report: TR-090121.

In the industry, it is common to pour more people in projects that need to increase customer satisfaction. Using a physical analogy we explore how far this works.

[Datta et al., 2009]

Datta, S., van Engelen, R., Wang, A. (2009). Predictux: A framework for predicting Linux kernel incremental release times. Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Technical Report: TR-090120.

Can we predict when the next release of a system will be due? We try to find out, using a real world system.


Articles etc

I think it is challenging and fun to reach out to a general audience about themes in computing that interest me. Following are some of my recent newspaper articles etc:

Article - Our 'Always-On' Lives (Deccan Herald, March 18 2012)
Article - World Wide Web and the Written Word (Technoholic, February 20 2012)
Article - Am I Who I Say I Am? (The Hindu, December 25 2011)
Article - The Tale of Three Deeply Different Technologists (The Hindu, November 13 2011)
Podcast - Software Engineering Theory and Practice: Shall the Twain Meet? (Bangalore Software Radio, August 2011)

Teaching

Following are the courses I am teaching or have taught in the last few years:

Fall 2016: Introduction to Computing at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2016: Introduction to Algorithms at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2016: Probability and Statistics at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2016: Elements of Software Construction at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2016: The Digital World at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2016: Research Seminar at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2015: Research Seminar at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2015: Probability and Statistics at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2015: The Digital World at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2014: Introduction to Algorithms at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2014: Elements of Software Construction at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2014: The Digital World at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Spring 2014: Research Seminar at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2013: Introduction to Design at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2013: Probability and Statistics at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2013: Research Seminar at the Singapore University of Technology and Design
Fall 2012: Research elective at the International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore
Spring 2012: Industry Oriented Software Engineering at the International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore
Fall 2011: Research elective at the International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore
Spring 2011: Industry Oriented Software Engineering at the International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore
Spring 2010: Industry Oriented Software Engineering at the International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore
Spring 2009: Web Programming and Design at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Spring 2008: Web Programming and Design Online at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Fall 2007: Web Programming and Design at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Summer 2007: Web Programming and Design at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Spring 2007: Introduction to Internet Technology at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Fall 2006: Introduction to Internet Technology at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Summer 2006: Java for Non-Majors at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University
Spring 2006: Java for Non-Majors at the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University

Consulting

Before I was in research and teaching, I was in practice. And after I have been in research and teaching, it is great to be connected with practice through consulting engagements. If your organization has a business problem or a customer "pain-point" you think we can work together to address, please contact me. Also, if you are interested in a customized course for your organization on themes such as business analytics, software development and design, globally distributed teams, supply chain management, let us discuss further.


Talks

Following are some my invited lectures, conference and workshop presentations in the last few years:

October 2015: The importance of being isolated: An empirical study on Chromium reviews, at the 9th ACM/IEEE International Symposium on Empirical Software Engineering and Measurement, Beijing
November 2014: Perspectives on task ownership in mobile operating system development, at the 2nd International Workshop on Software Development Lifecycle for Mobile, Hong Kong
November 2014: Developer involvement considered harmful? An empirical examination of Android bug resolution times, at the 6th International Workshop on Social Software Engineering, Hong Kong
August 2014: How many is too many? Quest for the sweet spot of collaboration in software development and research, at the Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata
May 2014: How many eyeballs does a bug need? An empirical validation of Linus' Law, at the 15th International Conference on Agile Software Development, Rome
November 2012: Empirical Insights into Software Development and Research, at Adobe Advanced Technology Labs, Bangalore
February 2011: Evolution of Developer Collaboration on the Jazz Platform, at the 4th India Software Engineering Conference, Thiruvananthapuram
April 2010: Software Development: From Instruction to Interaction, at the Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Ahmedabad
February 2009: Connecting across Cultures in a Connected World, at the Florida International Leadership Conference, Altoona, Florida
July 2008: Effects of Offshore and Outsourced Development on Responsibility Delegation to Software Components, at the Software Engineering for Offshore and Outsourced Development conference, ETH Zurich
April 2008: A Technique to Guide the Delegation of Responsibilities to Software Components, at the Fundamental Approaches to Software Engineering conference, Budapest
March 2008: Making Metrics Make a Difference, at the Project Management Institute (PMI) Metrics Special Interest Group's (MetSIG) webinar series
July 2007: Enterprise Software Development: Charm and Challenge at the Symbiosis Centre for Information Technology, Pune
July 2007: Metrics Driven Design: A Workshop, at the Symbiosis Centre for Information Technology, Pune
July 2007: Metrics-Driven Enterprise Software Development: Managing Requirements Change and its Impact on Software Design, at the Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune
March 2007: Tracking the Effects of Changing Requirements: A Case Study, at the ACM Southeast conference, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
March 2007: Metrics Driven Development: Taking Enterprise Software to the Next Level, at the Project Management Institute (PMI) Metrics Special Interest Group's (MetSIG) webinar series
April 2006: Effects of Changing Requirements: A Tracking Mechanism for the Analysis Workflow, at the ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, Dijon
March 2006: Crosscutting Score: An Indicator Metric for Aspect Orientation, at the ACM Southeast conference, Melbourne, Florida
March 2006: Agility Measurement Index: Deciding on a Methodology for Your Project, at the ACM Southeast conference, Melbourne, Florida
November 2005: Integrating the FURPS+ Model with Use Cases, at the IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering, Chicago

Blog

The Soft New World

The name of this blog has changed in the past, and may change again in the future. The focus has remained more or less unchanged; my reflections on software and the world. This blog is also simultaneously published by Amazon.


Contact

In recent times, how we connect and communicate has changed. Some of the change is truly transformational and I remain very interested how such change impacts our lives. However, I am generally not interested in hourly broadcasts from other people's lives. I think it is very fair this preference is reciprocated; people are generally not interested in hourly broadcasts from my life. Thus I do not feel inclined to post updates on what I did last summer or what is on my mind right now, in the public domain. Unless I am travelling or seriously preoccupied, I attend to my emails regularly. I look forward to hearing from you at:


This page was last updated on September 18, 2016.